Faberge Museum

The Faberge Museum is a new private art museum in St. Petersburg (opened in November of 2013) at the Shuvalov Palace. It presents art by Carl Faberge (as well as his contemporaries and followers), the great master of jewelry and objects of applied art of the late 19th and early 20th century.

The museum was founded by the Link of Times Fund owned by the Russian billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, who has long had the idea of creating a full-fledged center dedicated to preservation of the cultural heritage of Russia, and has been picking up artifacts for the museum for many years. The most famous pieces of the museum collection are the nine Faberge eggs bought by Vekselberg in 2004 from the newspaper magnate Malcolm Forbes. He bought it wholesale - even before the opening of the auction, paying $ 100 million for the entire collection.

This museum is currently the largest private collection of Russian applied art of the XIX-XX centuries, and has about 4,000 items on display. Visitors can see the very first egg crafted by Fabrege - called Chicken - made ??by the master in 1885. The museum also shows paintings by Russian and European artists - Renoir and Korovin, Briullov, etc.

 

The Shuvalov Palace was transferred to the fund in mid-2000 in a dilapidated condition. The best craftsmen participated in the restoration project and the building came to life again, acquiring a luxurious look. The cost of the restoration work was about 30 million dollars.

Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербург) is the second largest city in Russia. It is located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. St Petersburg is often described as the most westernized city of Russia, as well as its cultural capital.It is the northernmost city in the world with a population of over one million.

Population: 5 197 114 (2015)
Founded : 1703
Time zone : UTC+4
Federal District : Northwest
Area code : (00 7) 812
Postal code : 190000-199406
Former name : Petrograd (1914-1924)
Former name : Leningrad (1924-1991)